TriCom Technical Services

Be careful what you download…

In Advice, Cablevision, Comcast, copyright infringement, file sharing, ISP, Motion Picture Association of America, MPAA, pirating, Recording Industry Association of America, RIAA, Time Warner Cable, Verizon on July 12, 2012 at 3:16 pm

…because you’re being watched.

Starting today, internet service providers including Comcast, Time Warner Cable, Verizon, and Cablevision have agreed to police your downloads on behalf of the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA).

In an effort against infringement of members’ copyrights, file sharing, and online piracy, these ISPs are now monitoring your traffic.

According to the writers at Gizmodo, how the organizations use this technique can vary. “The program, commonly referred to as a ‘graduated response,’ requires that ISPs send out one or two educational notices to those customers who are accused of downloading copyrighted content illegally. If the customer doesn’t stop, the ISP is then asked to send out ‘confirmation notices’ asking that they confirm that they have received notice.

They will also be informed of the risks they incur if they don’t stop pirating material. The ISP then can ratchet up the pressure. The ISPs can choose from a list of penalties or what the RIAA calls ‘mitigation measures’ that include throttling down the customer’s connection speed to suspending Web access until the subscriber agrees to stop pirating. The ISPs can waive the mitigation measure if they choose.'”

In 2011, the RIAA and the MPAA have been responsible for introducing the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect IP (PIPA) acts to the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate, but failed when met with the online protest of major tech websites including Google and Wikipedia. However in this round, the groups have the support of the ISPs themselves, proving to be much more harmful.

Our recommendation: don’t share or download anything illegally until this blows over! Remember, you’re being watched.

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  1. The program, commonly referred to as “graduated response,” requires that ISPs send out one or two educational notices to those customers who are accused of downloading copyrighted content illegally. If the customer doesn’t stop, the ISP is then asked to send out “confirmation notices” asking that they confirm that they have received notice.

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